Multiple Domain email Addresses with Free email Accounts

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Written by Chris Hirst. Posted in eMail and Domain Management on 08 May 2015.
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Using 'free' email providers with your own domain name is not as complicated as you would think, certainly with Gmail, which is provided by Google, allows you to do this on their system but it does involve a bit of messing about with DNS and setting up sender policy (SPF) TXT records and Domain Keys (DKIM) TXT records to improve delivery rates by avoiding your email being regarded as "spam". There is however an easier way that can be used with any mail provider, such as Yahoo (not recommended), Hotmail, live.com, outlook.com all provided by Microsoft, GMX.com, mail.com from AT&T or Yandex.com. Yandex are a Russian provider so unless you read Cyrillic and know what 'спам' means keep away from Yandex and IMAP, as it doesn't always translete the mail box names in mail clients. tested this with Claws email, Thunderbird and KMail (Linux Mint user) and all names remained stubbornly in Russian.
 
So, to setting this up, I am not going to detail the setting up for all email clients so these steps are generic and you will need to apply them for the client that you are using. This article assumes that you already have a domain name registered and hosted, and the host allows for SMTP mail, at least one POP3 or IMAP account which, for this purpose does not need to be of any great capacity 5 or 10 MB is perfectly adequate, however do not call this mail box one of the commonly used names such as info@, enquiry@ accounts@ etc. as these do get spammed by default. You can be as inventive as you like with the name as this is only going to be your login NOT your contact mail address. Using a unusual name also means that it is less likely to be attacked by 'crackers' trying to 'break' the password. So let's say your one mailbox is called This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and has a complex password, at least nine characters long, you also should have created a free or cheap email account. The provider with whom you create this mailbox is not important, but if you want to use a mail client to download messages to a computer or laptop running Windows, Linux or MacOS and maybe check or send messages on a smartphone or tablet, you will need to ensure that this mailbox also includes IMAP and POP3 access. Gmail, Yahoo! and Outlook.com do, whereas GMX.com and Mail.com only provide this with a premium account, once again this account name can be fairly random as your recipients are not going to use this to contact you, so we will say this is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., here also you should use a complex password more than nine characters.
  
Now all the prerequisites in place we will set up your forwarding names. At your hosting company login to your account using the control panel they provide, here again I cannot be specific so will assume you are at least aquainted with it's function. In the email section you need to create a 'forwarder' or an 'alias', this alias is how your customers or friends are going to contact you and how you are going to be sending emails from. Here also you should avoid the common names to reduce the spam you will inevitably start receiving, if this is a personal account, your first name will probably be sufficient, therefore into the address field or name field type in your chosen identity, lets say 'barney', the server control panel will in most cases add the @yourdomain.me automatically when you save it, in the "receiving" or "recipient" address you enter the email address of the free account (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) then save the forwarder, this will then appear in the list forwarders you have for the domain name. With that bit completed any mail sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. will be delivered to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and you can read it there when logging via webmail or POP3, IMAP if allowed.
 
The next step is setting up an email client such as MS Outlook, Windows Live Mail, Mac mail, Mozilla Thunderbird, Claws Mail, Incredimail or any other of the many email clients that are available for whatever operating system you are running.
After you have chosen the client for you the next step is to configure an account. The two choices for reading mail are POP3 (Post Office Protocol v3) and IMAP (Internet Messaging Access Protocol), the differences are that IMAP leaves the messages on the host server while alloeing you to read the message or download any attatchments whereas POP downloads all the messages and attachments then removes them from the server, in this day and age with people having many devices that can receive mail IMAP is probabaly the protocol to use, at least until the message has run it's useful course, at which point you may wish to download the messages via POP and archive them on your office or home computer.
So on to setting up the account usually this starts with you entering your name and email address, this bit is important because this is how the frecipient will see your message and also sets the reply address, so the email address will be the alias that you created earlier (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), once that is done you can move on to the next step, some clients will offer to 'automatically configure' the rest DO NOT allow that and choose "manual set up" instead. The next step is usually to configure "Incoming mail" this is where you can choose POP3 or IMAP, please note; this cannot be changed later without deleting the account and starting from scratch. For incoming mail you need the POP3 or IMAP server name of the free provider, these can be found by logging in to your account and looking in the providers help system for "server addresses" or "server details" and for the incoming mail server use the name the provider supplied, the login name is usually your email address and this is the one you signed up with (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and the password you use there. Setting up the "Outgoing server (SMTP)" is next. Here the server name is the one at your domain hosting locaion. For this you will need your host to give you this information or it may be found in your control panel help documentation. The username for outgoing is he mailbox that you set up earlier (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and the password for that account. If your mail client has a "Test Settings" or "Send Test Message"  option you should be able to send a test email which, provided yourdomain.me has been registered for more than four days, so does exist in DNS should result in one message in your "Sent Items" folder and if you perform a "Send and Receive" or "Get new mail" you should get one into your "Inbox"
 
Congratulations you are now set up to send and receive messages for This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
Most hosting providers usually allow for many aliases to be set up going to a single external mail account, one such company is 2freehosting  registering for a free account allows you set up several accounts for your domain names with limited resources and if you follow the steps in this article to set up accounts in your mail client that are "send only" (Outgoing SMTP) you can appear to have several email addresses at yourdomain.me rather than using free email providers for your business, this is also a particularly effective way of keeping email addresses "spam-free", as you can sign up for all kinds of things that may be selling contact lists, as you can remove the forwarder if it proves to be adding to your 'inbox junk' and the spam will go nowhere. I use this method for joining forums that I may not want be a full time member, also when signing up for newsletters and such like that may prove to be prolific in their advertising. If your fears turn out to be groundless you can always change your contact details to something more permanent afterwards.
 
 
 

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